Home2Health

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Home2Health is a collaborative, two-year project led by the City of Fort Collins Planning and Social Sustainability Departments. We are joined in this work by our community partners - The Family Leadership Training Institute at CSU Extension, the Center for Public Deliberation at CSU, The Family Center/La Familia, and the Larimer County Department of Health and Environment.

Our objective over the next two years is to implement updates to policies, codes, and regulations to improve housing affordability with a specific emphasis on health equity. This effort will be based on community dialogue and capacity building -

Home2Health is a collaborative, two-year project led by the City of Fort Collins Planning and Social Sustainability Departments. We are joined in this work by our community partners - The Family Leadership Training Institute at CSU Extension, the Center for Public Deliberation at CSU, The Family Center/La Familia, and the Larimer County Department of Health and Environment.

Our objective over the next two years is to implement updates to policies, codes, and regulations to improve housing affordability with a specific emphasis on health equity. This effort will be based on community dialogue and capacity building - so that the voices and ideas of community members who are experiencing the day-to-day reality of housing instability are reflected in the policy decisions we make.

This project is being funded by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment's Health Disparities Grant Program. For more information about the grant program, visit https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/health-disparities-grant-program.

Home2Health es un proyecto colaborativo de dos años que dirigen los Departamentos de Sostenibilidad Social y Planeamiento de la Ciudad de Fort Collins (City of Fort Collins Planning and Social Sustainability). En este trabajo nos unimos a nuestros socios comunitarios: The Family Leadership Training Institute at CSU Extension (Instituto de Capacitación en Liderazgo Familiar) en CSU, Center for Public Deliberation at CSU (Centro de Deliberación Pública) en CSU, The Family Center/La Familia y Larimer County Department of Health and Environment (Departamento de Salud y Medio Ambiente del Condado de Larimer).

Nuestro objetivo en los próximos dos años es implementar actualizaciones a las políticas, códigos y regulaciones para mejorar la accesibilidad a la vivienda con un énfasis específico en la equidad sanitaria. Este esfuerzo se basará en el diálogo con la comunidad y la construcción de capacidad, para que las opiniones y las ideas de los integrantes de la comunidad que afrontan la realidad diaria de la inestabilidad de vivienda se reflejen en las decisiones regulatorias que tomamos.

Este proyecto es financiado por el Departamento de Salud Pública de Colorado (Colorado Department of Public Health) y el Programa de Subsidio de Disparidades de Salud del Medio Ambiente (Environment's Health Disparities Grant Program). Para obtener más información sobre el programa de subsidio, visite https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/health-disparities-grant-program.

*This project is funded in part by Amendment 35 Health Disparities Grant Program funding. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the official policies of, nor does the mention of imply endorsement by, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

*Este proyecto está financiado en parte por los fondos del Amendment 35 Health Disparities Grant Program (Modificación 35: Programa de subsidios para becas por desigualdad sanitaria). Las opiniones expresadas no necesariamente reflejan las políticas oficiales ni implican el apoyo del Departamento de Salud Pública y Medio Ambiente de Colorado (Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment).

  • June News Updates

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    23 days ago

    Civil Rights March, Washington DC August 28th, 1963 & Protesters in response to the murder of George Floyd, June 2020. (https://unsplash.com/s/photos/civil-rights)


    Housing Inequality and The Disease of Racism

    It has been a challenging time for humanity. We find our country reliving history, a sort of civil rights “Déjà vu” and as I sit with my feelings around the televised murder of George Floyd, I think about my own experience with racism. I have always identified as bi-racial, but I was born into a family history of racism. I grew up in Portland, Oregon as the only child...

    Civil Rights March, Washington DC August 28th, 1963 & Protesters in response to the murder of George Floyd, June 2020. (https://unsplash.com/s/photos/civil-rights)


    Housing Inequality and The Disease of Racism

    It has been a challenging time for humanity. We find our country reliving history, a sort of civil rights “Déjà vu” and as I sit with my feelings around the televised murder of George Floyd, I think about my own experience with racism. I have always identified as bi-racial, but I was born into a family history of racism. I grew up in Portland, Oregon as the only child to a white mother, white grandparents and white aunts and uncles. My great-grandfather on my mother’s side had ties to Klan activity. Reminders of my otherness showed up in family dinners where tempers flared about my absent father, my mother’s disappointing choice. I grew up in white neighborhoods and attended a predominately white elementary school. I leaped into my identity of color after convincing my mother to allow me to attend a predominately black middle school on the other side of the river.

    Three years of hour-long commutes by school bus to and from “the bad side of town” opened my eyes up to housing inequality at such a very young age. Isolating bus rides out of my pristine, white-suburban neighborhoods into the disarray of what had once been a thriving black community was education at its best. My other-side-of-the-river school mates couldn’t come home with me to play as I lived too far away in unfamiliar territory and the same applied to me. My time at Harriet Tubman Middle School changed my life. Suddenly the things about myself that felt so different like skin color and hair texture were commonplace but there was a new otherness I had to acknowledge and that was the lightness of my skin-tone. Now, I was neither white or black, I was “mixed” or what is now referred to as “bi-racial” and secretly, I loved this new identity. As a teen and adult, I have enjoyed a seat in-between, a racial gate between my white and black friends and I recognize that is a seat of privilege. I speak to put into perspective that within the social construct of racism there are layers and layers, we all carry whether we can identify them or not. The disease that is racism is so deeply rooted in our history and lived experiences that it will take all of us to recognize it. Through story and action, we can attempt to heal old wounds, educated ourselves and shift our perspectives.

    Home2Health Program Assistant

    Yaz Haldeman


    June is National Healthy Homes Month!

    The City of Fort Collins’ Healthy Homes Program is celebrating National Healthy Homes Month by sharing resources and gifts on how to create a healthier and safer home. Indoor air quality can be up to 5 times worse than outdoor air, and with more time being spent in homes, it is more important than ever to ensure our homes are healthy.

    Complete a DIY Assessment of your home and receive a personalized set of recommendations on how to reduce exposure to indoor air contaminants and safety hazards. Along with recommendations, if you complete the assessment and email the Healthy Homes Program (healthyhomes@fcgov.com) with your results before the end of the month, you will receive free gifts, including: Radon Test Kit, Healthy Household Cleaner, Healthy Household Cleaning Recipes and a Sustainable Cloth for Dusting.

    In order to be eligible for the free gifts, Fort Collins community members must complete the online assessment and email in their results before July 1, 2020. Learn more here: fcgov.com/healthyhomes


    City of Fort Collins Selects Interim Housing Manager

    Earlier this year, the City began recruitment for our very first Housing Manager. The position’s goal is to elevate and accelerate strategic vision and execution of one of the top Council and community priorities – Affordable and Attainable Housing. The COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic impact on household incomes has made the need for housing stability even more critical in response and recovery. We also recognize that housing is one of the most inequitable systems in our country, and there is much work to do to begin dismantling these inequities.

    Though the City is currently operating under a hiring freeze, the City has selected Lindsay Ex to serve as the Interim Housing Manager for the next 9-12 months to continue supporting critical work on housing affordability and stability. Lindsay has a planning background, served on the core team for City Plan, and was in the City’s Planning, Development and Transportation service area for 5 years prior to becoming the Climate Program Manager in Sustainability Services in 2015.

    One of Lindsay’s main areas of focus will be the development of the City’s first Housing Strategic Plan, which will expand the scope of our prior Affordable Housing Strategic Plans. The Housing Strategic Plan will be developed over the next year in close partnership and collaboration with Home2Health, community members, and key stakeholders. To begin this work, Lindsay is conducting a series of listening sessions with various stakeholders and community groups. If you would like to visit with her, please contact Lindsay at lex@fcgov.com.


    Mark Your Calendars: Our Climate Future Affordable Housing Week (July 6th-10th)

    Our Climate Future will be asking community members for their ideas on how to achieve the community’s goals around waste, energy, and climate as part of the next phase of Our Climate Future. This new phase of engagement builds upon priorities identified last fall, which include affordable housing, sustainable transportation, reuse and recycling, renewable energy, equity, inclusion, and more.

    We have seen how collective action changed the course of the COVID-19 pandemic and we are seeing how it is elevating the voices of people of color to combat systemic racism in America. Collective action can also be a powerful tool to ensuring our climate future is equitable, resilient, and prosperous for all and we want your ideas and solutions!

    Learn more at fcgov.com/climatefuture.

    Want to share your ideas for Our Climate Future?

    Want to dive deeper? Sign up for an affordable housing workshop!



    Home2Health Year One Reflections

    It’s hard to believe the Home2Health project is nearing the end of its first year. As our partners (Larimer County, CSU’s Center for Public Deliberation, Family Leadership Training Institute, La Famila and Partnership for Age Friendly Communities) reflect over the take-aways from year one, here is some of what’s been said:

    “In reflection for capacity building for collective action, we have to continue to look for ways we can work together to change policy”.

    “We did a good job of engaging marginalized communities and community members that are part of the communities of color and we pivoted quickly to online technology in response to COVID-19”.

    “Community Guides have uniquely empowered all of the folks that they have trained. In my mind, we have empowered them (Guides) to go out and be leaders in the community”.

    “It takes a lot of internal champions to make this type of work happen and there has been a ton of ground cover amidst a pandemic.”

    We are excited to continue moving this work forward in Home2Health’s second year, and to keep growing, learning, and building capacity for change in Fort Collins.






  • Actualizaciones de Junio

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    19 days ago


    Marcha por los Derechos Civiles, Washington DC 28 de agosto de 1963 y Manifestantes en respuesta al asesinato de George Floyd, junio de 2020. (https://unsplash.com/s/photos/civil-rights)


    Desigualdad de vivienda y la enfermedad del racismo

    Ha sido una época difícil para la humanidad. Encontramos a nuestro país reviviendo la historia, una especie de "Déjà vu" de los derechos civiles y mientras me siento con mis sentimientos en torno al asesinato televisado de George Floyd, pienso en mi propia experiencia con el racismo. Siempre me he identificado como birracial, pero nací en una historia familiar de racismo. Crecí en Portland, Oregón,...


    Marcha por los Derechos Civiles, Washington DC 28 de agosto de 1963 y Manifestantes en respuesta al asesinato de George Floyd, junio de 2020. (https://unsplash.com/s/photos/civil-rights)


    Desigualdad de vivienda y la enfermedad del racismo

    Ha sido una época difícil para la humanidad. Encontramos a nuestro país reviviendo la historia, una especie de "Déjà vu" de los derechos civiles y mientras me siento con mis sentimientos en torno al asesinato televisado de George Floyd, pienso en mi propia experiencia con el racismo. Siempre me he identificado como birracial, pero nací en una historia familiar de racismo. Crecí en Portland, Oregón, como hija única de una madre blanca, abuelos blancos y tíos blancos. Mi bisabuelo por parte de mi madre tenía lazos con las actividades del Klan. Los recuerdos de mi alteridad aparecieron en las cenas familiares donde se agitaron los ánimos por la ausencia de mi padre, la decepcionante elección de mi madre. Crecí en barrios blancos y asistí a una escuela primaria predominantemente blanca. Pasé a mi identidad de color después de convencer a mi madre de que me permitiera asistir a una escuela secundaria predominantemente negra al otro lado del río.

    Tres años de viajes de una hora en autobús escolar hacia y desde "el lado malo de la ciudad" me abrieron los ojos a la desigualdad en la vivienda a una edad tan temprana. Los aislados viajes en autobús de mis prístinos vecindarios suburbanos blancos hacia el desorden de lo que una vez fue una próspera comunidad negra fue la educación en su mejor momento. Mis compañeros de la escuela del otro lado del río no podían venir a casa conmigo a jugar porque vivía demasiado lejos en un territorio desconocido y lo mismo se aplicaba a mí. El tiempo que pasé en la Escuela Secundaria Harriet Tubman cambió mi vida. De repente, las cosas sobre mí que se sentían tan diferentes como el color de la piel y la textura del cabello eran comunes, pero había una nueva alteridad que tenía que reconocer y era la ligereza de mi tono de piel. Ahora, no era ni blanca ni negra, era "mestiza" o lo que ahora se llama "birracial" y secretamente, amaba esta nueva identidad. Como adolescente y adulta, he disfrutado de un asiento en el medio, una puerta racial entre mis amigos blancos y negros, pero reconocí que es un asiento de privilegio. Hablo de esto para poner en perspectiva que dentro de la construcción social del racismo hay capas y estratos, todos llevamos si podemos identificarlos o no. La enfermedad que es el racismo está tan profundamente arraigada en nuestra historia y en las experiencias vividas que será necesario que todos la reconozcamos, la nombremos y la llamemos. A través de la historia, podemos intentar curar viejas heridas, educarnos y cambiar nuestras perspectivas.

    Asistente del Programa Home2Health

    Yaz Haldeman


    ¡Junio es el mes nacional de los hogares saludables!

    El Programa de Hogares Saludables de la Ciudad de Fort Collins está celebrando el Mes Nacional de los Hogares Saludables compartiendo recursos y regalos sobre cómo crear un hogar más saludable y seguro. La calidad del aire interior puede ser hasta 5 veces peor que la del aire exterior, y al pasar más tiempo en los hogares, es más importante que nunca asegurarse de que nuestros hogares sean saludables.

    Complete la autoevaluación de su hogar y reciba un conjunto personalizado de recomendaciones sobre cómo reducir la exposición a los contaminantes del aire interior y los riesgos de seguridad. Junto con las recomendaciones, si completa la evaluación y envía un correo electrónico al Programa de Hogares Saludables (healthyhomes@fcgov.com) con sus resultados antes de fin de mes, recibirá regalos gratuitos, entre ellos: kit de prueba de radón, limpiador de hogares saludables, recetas de limpieza de hogares saludables y un paño sostenible para quitar el polvo.

    Para ser elegibles para los regalos, los miembros de la comunidad de Fort Collins deben completar la evaluación en línea y enviar los resultados por correo electrónico antes del 1 de julio de 2020. Más información aquí: fcgov.com/healthyhomes


    La ciudad de Fort Collins selecciona un gerente interino de vivienda

    A principios de este año, la ciudad comenzó a reclutar a nuestro primer gerente de vivienda. El objetivo del puesto es elevar y acelerar la visión estratégica y la ejecución de una de las principales prioridades del Consejo y de la comunidad: la vivienda asequible y accesible. La pandemia COVID-19 y el consiguiente impacto económico en los ingresos de los hogares ha hecho que la necesidad de estabilidad en la vivienda sea aún más crítica en la respuesta y la recuperación. También reconocemos que la vivienda es uno de los sistemas más injustos de nuestro país, y hay mucho trabajo por hacer para empezar a desmantelar estas desigualdades.

    Aunque la ciudad está operando actualmente bajo una congelación de las contrataciones, la ciudad ha seleccionado a Lindsay Ex para servir como gerente interina de vivienda durante los próximos 9-12 meses para continuar apoyando el trabajo crítico sobre la asequibilidad y estabilidad de la vivienda. Lindsay tiene antecedentes de planificación, sirvió en el equipo central de City Plan, y estuvo en el área de servicio de Planificación, Desarrollo y Transporte de la Ciudad durante 5 años antes de convertirse en la Gerente del Programa de Clima en Servicios de Sostenibilidad en 2015.

    Una de las principales áreas de atención de Lindsay será el desarrollo del primer Plan Estratégico de Vivienda de la Ciudad, que ampliará el alcance de nuestros anteriores Planes Estratégicos de Vivienda Asequible. El Plan Estratégico de Vivienda se desarrollará durante el próximo año en estrecha asociación y colaboración con Home2Health, los miembros de la comunidad y los principales interesados. Para comenzar este trabajo, Lindsay está llevando a cabo una serie de sesiones de escucha con varios interesados y grupos comunitarios. Si desea visitarla, contacte con Lindsay en lex@fcgov.com.


    Marque sus calendarios: Semana de la Vivienda Asequible de Our Climate Future (6-10 de julio)

    Our Climate Future pedirá a los miembros de la comunidad sus ideas sobre cómo lograr los objetivos de la comunidad en torno a los residuos, la energía y el clima como parte de la próxima fase de Our Climate Future. Esta nueva fase de compromiso se basa en las prioridades identificadas el otoño pasado, que incluyen la vivienda asequible, el transporte sostenible, la reutilización y el reciclaje, la energía renovable, la equidad, la inclusión y más.

    Hemos visto cómo la acción colectiva cambió el curso de la pandemia de COVID-19 y estamos viendo cómo está elevando las voces de la gente de color para combatir el racismo sistémico en América. La acción colectiva también puede ser una herramienta poderosa para asegurar que nuestro futuro climático sea equitativo, resistente y próspero para todos, ¡y queremos sus ideas y soluciones!

    Más información en fcgov.com/climatefuture.

    ¿Quiere compartir sus ideas para Our Climate Future?

    ¿Quiere sumergirse más profundamente? ¡Inscríbase en un taller de vivienda económica!



    Reflexiones del primer año de Home2Health

    Es difícil de creer que el proyecto Home2Health se acerque al final de su primer año. Como nuestros socios (Larimer County, CSU’s Center for Public Deliberation, Family Leadership Training Institute, La Famila and Partnership for Age Friendly Communities) reflexionan sobre las tomas de posición desde el primer año, aquí está algo de lo que se ha dicho:

    Patti Schmitt, Family Leadership Training Institute @CSU Extension, “En la reflexión para la creación de capacidad para la acción colectiva, tenemos que seguir buscando formas de trabajar juntos para cambiar la política”.

    Leo Escalante, personal de la ciudad, “Hicimos un buen trabajo al involucrar a las comunidades marginadas y a los miembros de la comunidad que forman parte de las comunidades de color y nos volcamos rápidamente a la tecnología en línea en respuesta a COVID-19”.

    Sabrina Slagowski-Tipton, Centro de Deliberación Pública de CSU, "Los guías de la comunidad han facultado de manera única a toda las personas que han entrenado. En mi opinión, les hemos dado poder (a los guías) para que salgan y sean líderes en la comunidad".

    Kelly Hayworth, condado de Larimer, “Se necesitan muchos campeones internos para hacer este tipo de trabajo y ha habido una tonelada de cobertura de terreno en medio de una pandemia”.







  • May News Updates

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    2 months ago

    Home2Health Project

    Fort Collins Red Cross Nurse Parade from 1917. This is WWI-related and not flu-related, but it does show the town of Fort Collins coming together and gives us a historical glimpse into our city. (Museum of Discovery Photo Archives)


    Home2Health & the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery: Making History

    As we continue to navigate through the uncertainty of COVID-19, one thing that is certain is that stories about health and housing have never been more important to capture. The Home2Health project is collaborating with the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery’s Making History project to collect community stories through...

    Home2Health Project

    Fort Collins Red Cross Nurse Parade from 1917. This is WWI-related and not flu-related, but it does show the town of Fort Collins coming together and gives us a historical glimpse into our city. (Museum of Discovery Photo Archives)


    Home2Health & the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery: Making History

    As we continue to navigate through the uncertainty of COVID-19, one thing that is certain is that stories about health and housing have never been more important to capture. The Home2Health project is collaborating with the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery’s Making History project to collect community stories through one central platform. Home2Health will use the stories collected to inform future health and housing policy. Beyond stories, you can share observations, images, sound files, and moving images. The Museum will be taking digital submissions throughout the COVID-19 health crisis, and over time, they plan to expand by collecting artwork, journals, interviews and objects that help tell the story of this unprecedented time in history. Ultimately, submitted materials will become part of the Collections and Archive at Fort Collins Museum of Discovery and may be used in future exhibits, programs, and publications. The prompts on the Museum’s online form are general so, when sharing your story, we encourage you to consider these two additional questions:

    1. How has COVID-19 and the economic shutdown impacted your health and/or housing?
    2. How should we use this COVID-19 health crisis to create opportunities for better health and housing in our community?

    Ready to share your story? Click here to get started!

    Concerned about your privacy? The name and email fields of this form are not required and allow you to submit an anonymous story. If you have any questions, concerns, or technical difficulties, please reach out to the Home2Health team at home2health@fcgov.com.


    CSU’s Center for Public Deliberation – Community Guides, Phase 2

    Our partners at CSU’s Center for Public Deliberation have just launched Phase 2 of the Home2Health Community Guide program. Community Guides work to lift the voices of our communities by conducting conversations within their own networks and providing feedback from those discussions to the City.

    For this round of engagement, we’ll continue hearing from our residents about their experiences with housing and health and will expand those conversations to learn about the fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent economic impacts. Currently, we’re recruiting guides who have previously worked with the City and the CPD as Community Guides, Plan Ambassadors, or a Community Partners for Home2Health, Our Climate Future, or City Plan. If you’ve worked in that capacity before and want to be a part of the Community Guide program, apply here!

    We’re hoping to open this opportunity to the wider community soon, particularly for those interested in connecting with historically underserved community members. If you’re interested in becoming a Community Guide in the future or want to learn more, visit the Community Guide Training Hub, which offers online lessons on how to conduct conversations and connect with community members.


    For Fort Collins & For FoCo

    Recently, a collaboration of community partners launched a campaign aimed at supporting local businesses, particularly those in the industries most affected by COVID-19. This campaign is called “For Fort Collins” and the website forfortcollins.com is a source of information for the latest physical distancing requirements and best practices for local business.

    For FoCo, a companion website, will serve as a resource for Fort Collins residents to share stories, photos and video about how they are staying connected to neighbors and the larger community during both the outbreak and recovery efforts. This site has a variety of engagement opportunities and we encourage you to check out both sites to stay educated, up-to-date and, to learn about how to get involved.


  • Actualizaciones de Mayo

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    2 months ago